The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Having somehow managed to avoid seeing either versions of the film, I was quite excited to pick up the first of this renowned trilogy and find out where the hype began. Just over a week of obsessive reading later, I was not disappointed.

While I’m certainly no expert on crime thriller novels, I can clearly tell that Larsson has produced a masterpiece of the genre. Murder, mystery and uncovered truths: The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo bears all the hallmarks of a classic thriller, expertly woven into a sophisticated narrative that keeps you perplexed and second guessing from start to finish.

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The History of Bees, by Maja Lunde

Spanning across three different timelines centuries apart, The History of Bees tells a rounded narrative of mankind’s industrialisation, from its hopeful beginnings in the 19th century to the sorry aftermath predicted by the late 21st. Through the parameter of our hardworking honey-making friends, Lunde explores the all too real repercussions of humanity’s continuous strive to mold nature to its whims.

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A Week in December, by Sebastian Faulks

Truly a masterful reflection on today’s society, A Week in December offers a snapshot into a variety of lives within the realms of modern London. Juxtaposed from the rich to the poor, the fanatic to the bemused, Faulks explores the subtle parts which can link otherwise vastly different lives.

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Kafka on the Shore, by Haruki Murakami

Kafka on the Shore is now the fourth Murakami novel I have had the pleasure to read, and I must say is quite possibly my favourite so far. To explain why however is somewhat difficult, for each of his novels have transfixed me with their individual quirky narratives and mesmerising style.

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The Man in the High Castle, by Philip K. Dick

What would life be like if the Allies had lost the Second World War? In an imaginative alternate reality, Philip K. Dick creates a world in which Japan occupies America, and the Nazis are moving their totalitarian conquest on to the solar system.

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And the Mountains Echoed, by Khaled Hosseini

Unlike his other novels, affamed for their heartbreaking and tellingly brutal tales, And the Mountains Echoed forges a story of another kind of sadness.

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Norwegian Wood, by Haruki Murakami

Set during the late 1960s, Norwegian Wood is a heartfelt ode to adolescence, filled with both the mindless and mindful meanderings of the young soul struggling along the path to maturity.

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