A Week in December, by Sebastian Faulks

Truly a masterful reflection on today’s society, A Week in December offers a snapshot into a variety of lives within the realms of modern London. Juxtaposed from the rich to the poor, the fanatic to the bemused, Faulks explores the subtle parts which can link otherwise vastly different lives.

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Kafka on the Shore, by Haruki Murakami

Kafka on the Shore is now the fourth Murakami novel I have had the pleasure to read, and I must say is quite possibly my favourite so far. To explain why however is somewhat difficult, for each of his novels have transfixed me with their individual quirky narratives and mesmerising style.

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Lustrum, by Robert Harris

Lustrum is the second of the Cicero trilogy, following on the story of one of the greatest orators of the late Roman Republic. Having energetically fought for his consulship in the first novel, Lustrum now tracks Cicero’s equally masterful term in office. Threatened by force, by wealth and by the Roman mob ever baying for blood, Cicero proves that even a new man can surpass his enemies and rise to the very heights of power in Rome.

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The Talented Mr Ripley, by Patricia Highsmith

Tom Ripley is young, charming and unstoppably ambitious.

What has now become a timeless classic, The Talented Mr Ripley is a thriller that delves deep into the mind of a disturbed young man. Utilising the subtle arts of deception and persuasion, Highsmith creates a bold tale of crime and murder, observing the psychotic tendencies underlying her compelling character in a chillingly casual way.

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The Brief and Frightening Reign of Phil, by George Saunders

An earlier work of Saunders’, The Brief and Frightening Reign of Phil treads the familiar grounds of social commentary common to all his novels. With a particular abundance of the whimsical, strange and downright fantastical, this was certainly an interesting read.

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Solo, by William Boyd

It is no easy task to continue the story of another, however when I discovered that William Boyd had written a ‘James Bond’ novel, I knew that the continuation of this franchise would be safe in the hands of one of my favourite and most compelling authors. Solo certainly didn’t disappoint.

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The Man in the High Castle, by Philip K. Dick

What would life be like if the Allies had lost the Second World War? In an imaginative alternate reality, Philip K. Dick creates a world in which Japan occupies America, and the Nazis are moving their totalitarian conquest on to the solar system.

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