American Gods, by Neil Gaiman 

This is a strange but immersing novel, which pushes the limits of reality in a mesmerising way. Gaiman’s style is certainly fast paced, flitting from one peculiar yet absorbing scene to another. Whilst at first it is somewhat of a struggle to keep up, the very atmosphere of the novel keeps you yearning for more.


As is often a point of inspiration for Gaiman’s works, Norse mythology plays a prominent role in American Gods, alongside a plethora of historical myths from across the ages. This will leave any historically inclined readers eager for more. Gaiman intermixes the modern with the mythological in a truly compelling way, leaving no doubt that a God should be wolfing down a hamburger at a roadside restaurant, or conjuring a storm before the unseeing eyes of humanity. He lends a plaintive sincerity concerning the mythical and other-worldly that is both simultaneously confusing and compelling.

 

American Gods presents America as the vast land of multicultural origin it is, whose history is now threatened by the advances of the modern age. Despite his English background, Gaiman lends an important perspective on American culture, both in the past and the present. Belief is presented as an abstract notion, one which is not entirely outside of reality, but not quite within it either.

 

This is a long and strange novel, but one I couldn’t seem to get enough of. With an endless supply of characters, some strange, some absurd, but certainly all interesting, this novel consistently surprises, entertains and intrigues. It is best not to question, not to object, but simply enjoy as Gaiman spins his fabled tale.

 

Length: 736 (Headline Review)

Overall Rating: 4 stars

 

Like the sound of this? Purchase it from Amazon now!.


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Author: Jack Jakins

A recent graduate of history, now an aspiring writer and general cynicist

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