The Watchmaker of Filigree Street, by Natasha Pulley 

The Watchmaker of Filigree Street is a fantastical novel suppressed by nineteenth century British charm. Following the narratives of a man working as a Telegraphy Clerk, as well as a woman exploring the bounds of early science, the novel is drawn about the centrifugal force of Mr Mori, the watchmaker of Filigree Street. Combining mysterious wonders with clear and dangerous realities, the novel quickly progresses from being a curious wonder to an absorbing page turner.

With the novel set in the latter part of the nineteenth century, Pulley has clearly done her research, careful to lend great marvels upon small wonders for the modern eye. The result of this is ever more interest towards the encapsulating character of Mr Mori. Impossible workings are given logical yet insubstantial solutions, leaving the reading ever wondering what truly is going on.

 

Though I began this novel somewhat unaccustomed to Pulley’s writing style, which often jumps to sudden events without breaking flow, I did grow accustomed to it. That being said, certain instances did appear to occur so suddenly you often find yourself reading on, only to flit back suddenly to understand the subsequent aftermath.

All in all, however, this was a compelling read, with the mystery of its interesting characters drawing the reader all the way to its end.

Length: 336 (Bloomsbury)
Overall Rating: 2.5

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Author: Jack Jakins

A recent graduate of history, now an aspiring writer and general cynicist

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