Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, by Yuval Noah Harari

As the world continues to evolve at a breathtaking pace, Homo Deus offers a brief glimpse into our rapidly approaching future. Basing his predictions on current technological trends, Yuval Noah Harari envisions a society ruled by complex algorithms and biotechnology, as part of a new self-imposed evolution within our species. With new advancements continuing to emerge in modern science, Harari’s work considers our past, present and future, in a bid to understand the potential outcomes and consequences of these emerging changes.

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The Descent of Man, by Grayson Perry

Filled with irony, cynicism and more than a touch of humour, The Descent of Man is a very enjoyable yet thought-provoking read on a subject that continues to have a major influence on society as we know it today. Masculinity.

From the bravado of sport and competition, to the strangled nature of male emotions, The Descent of Man takes the reader on a journey covering all aspects of the modern man. Reflecting on his own experiences, Perry lends a poignant observation on masculinity in today’s world, exploring it’s history and the predominantly damaging nature it has upon how half the population think and act.

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The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Having somehow managed to avoid seeing either versions of the film, I was quite excited to pick up the first of this renowned trilogy and find out where the hype began. Just over a week of obsessive reading later, I was not disappointed.

While I’m certainly no expert on crime thriller novels, I can clearly tell that Larsson has produced a masterpiece of the genre. Murder, mystery and uncovered truths: The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo bears all the hallmarks of a classic thriller, expertly woven into a sophisticated narrative that keeps you perplexed and second guessing from start to finish.

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The History of Bees, by Maja Lunde

Spanning across three different timelines centuries apart, The History of Bees tells a rounded narrative of mankind’s industrialisation, from its hopeful beginnings in the 19th century to the sorry aftermath predicted by the late 21st. Through the parameter of our hardworking honey-making friends, Lunde explores the all too real repercussions of humanity’s continuous strive to mold nature to its whims.

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A Week in December, by Sebastian Faulks

Truly a masterful reflection on today’s society, A Week in December offers a snapshot into a variety of lives within the realms of modern London. Juxtaposed from the rich to the poor, the fanatic to the bemused, Faulks explores the subtle parts which can link otherwise vastly different lives.

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Kafka on the Shore, by Haruki Murakami

Kafka on the Shore is now the fourth Murakami novel I have had the pleasure to read, and I must say is quite possibly my favourite so far. To explain why however is somewhat difficult, for each of his novels have transfixed me with their individual quirky narratives and mesmerising style.

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Lustrum, by Robert Harris

Lustrum is the second of the Cicero trilogy, following on the story of one of the greatest orators of the late Roman Republic. Having energetically fought for his consulship in the first novel, Lustrum now tracks Cicero’s equally masterful term in office. Threatened by force, by wealth and by the Roman mob ever baying for blood, Cicero proves that even a new man can surpass his enemies and rise to the very heights of power in Rome.

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